Coach Connection Newsletter #20 - 5/17/19

Coach Connection Newsletter #20 - 5/17/19

 | Thursday, May 23, 2019

Minor Athlete Abuse Prevention Policy 

The Minor Athlete Abuse Prevention Policy is required to be implemented by June 23rd. We are breaking the policy down into chunks to make implementing easier for teams. Go to sftest.usaswimming.org/maapp to find information about the travel requirements, and all the additional information. Additionally, make sure that all of your athletes that are 18+ complete the Athlete Protection Training by this same date. The training they have to take is the same that all other non-athlete members have to take and can be accessed at https://sftest.usaswimming.org/utility/landing-pages/safe-sport/apt. For questions please contact safesport@usaswimming.org.

Assistant Coach Application for the National Open Water Select Camp

Closes June 3rd

The assistant coach application for the National Open Water Select Camp is now open! The camp will be held from August 13-18 in Pleasant Prairie, WI in conjunction with the UANA Junior Open Water Swimming Championships. The application will be open until Monday, June 3rd and can be found here. Open water experience is required to be on staff. 

Start Paying Attention to Your Mindset

By Olivier Poirier-Leroy, May 8, 2019

8 things:

9 more things:

All Things 2020 Olympic Swimming Trials

Plan on attending with your team and families!

400 days!

Tickets go on sale July 1, 2019.  Don’t miss out!

July 1, 2019 – All-Session tickets open for general public via Ticketmaster

November 15, 2019 – Launch of 4-day ticket package (based on availability; date subject to change)

February 15, 2020 – Launch of Daily and Single-Session tickets (based on availability; date subject to change)

Learn more

Clean Sport

United States Anti- Doping Agency (USADA)

The information below should be shared with your athletes and their parents. Please distribute it via email, a club newsletter, or link to the articles on your team webpage.

Supplements:

Supplement FAQ: Are herbal supplements safe? Find out:  

Don't forget to check out our Supplement Guide, which gives great info on the risks of dietary supplements and a foodfirst approach! 

Resources:

Clomiphene is prohibited at all times under the WADA Prohibited List.

Learn more about the substance and the health risks associated with it.  

Sample collection & analysis process: Sample Collection- Sample Transportation- Sample Inspection -Sample Analysis -Sample Results.

Read more on the journey your sample takes: 

CSP Tideriders raised how much during their Swim-a-Thon?! 

If you need to be convinced that Swim-a-Thon is an effective fundraiser, look no further than the CSP Tideriders. In one of their best events to date, the CSP Tideriders raised $51,600 during their 2019 Swim-a-Thon. So how’d they do it? By staying organized, incentivizing their swimmers, and keeping it fun! You can be just as successful! You can find helpful hints and ideas on how to promote and run your event in our 2019 Swim-a-Thon Book of Success. Your team could be one of the 1,000+ clubs that together have raised more than $64.8 million dollars through Swim-a-Thon! Get excited to host your 2019 USA Swimming Foundation Swim-a-Thon. Learn more or register for your Swim-a-Thon fundraiser today by visiting
our website.

5 Tips to Help Schools Retain Event Volunteers

By Kevin Hoffman, coachad.com, April 28, 2019

One of the most difficult tasks for an athletic administrator is finding reliable, qualified volunteers to staff games, tournaments and other sporting events. It can be even more challenging retaining them.

While volunteers typically don’t expect to receive anything for their services, offering perks improves your chances of keeping them coming back year after year. Oftentimes, those perks come at little or no cost to the athletic department.

Here are five popular ideas used by Coach & Athletic Directors readers that will limit turnover, helping you to retain volunteers for the long term.

Learn more

Stop And Smell The Roses

By Harvey MacKay, Harvey's Weekly Column, May 9, 2019 

A young and successful executive was traveling down a neighborhood street, enjoying his new Jaguar. He was watching for kids darting out from between parked cars and slowed down when he thought he saw something. As his car passed, no children appeared. Instead, a brick smashed into the Jag’s side door! He slammed on the brakes and backed up to the spot where the brick had been thrown.

Learn more

Making a Coach Notebook

By James Leath, UTathlete.com, April 24, 2019

"There is a choice you have to make, 

In everything you do. 

So keep in mind that in the end, 

the choice you make, makes you."

This short poem is by John Wooden, found in The Essential Wooden: A Lifetime of Lessons on Leaders and Leadership. 

Do you have a notebook where you keep things like this? For two decades now I have collected items like this in notebooks, on index cards, and in Evernote files. When a situation calls for a certain subject, I can quickly go into my files and pull out something great for that specific situation. I encourage you to start doing this. 

Here are some tips to get started making a Coach Notebook:

For the digitally inclined, Evernote is perfect. Create a notebook, name it something like "Coach Notebook" and start adding in things like articles, quotes, and thoughts on a specific subject. You can "tag" each note with a subject that makes it easy to find later.

This is my default method for aggregating content. 

For those who prefer to use pen and paper, get yourself a nice journal and carry it with you always. As you find things, create a "table of contents" in the front of the journal and make pages like Quotes, Strategy, Leadership, etc. and when you run across content that would fit, then open to that page and write it down. Then, when in line somewhere, instead of taking out your phone, open your journal. I have at least 10 of these commonplace notebooks. I use Moleskin Notebooks and it is a rare occurrence that I am not carrying one around with me. 

5 Ways to Stop Giving Bad Feedback

By J.P. Nerbun, Thriveonchallenges.com, February 14, 2019

In 1998, Carol Dweck, a Stanford research psychologist and the author of the book Mindset, took over 400 fifth-grade students across the country and gave them all of them a very easy IQ test.

After the test, she split the students into two groups: She praised the first group by saying, “Good job! You must be really smart”, and she praised the second group by saying, “Good job! You must have worked really hard on this.”

Two things happened next:
 

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