Coach Connection Newsletter #15 - 4/13/18

Coach Connection Newsletter #15 - 4/13/18

 | Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Backstroke Start Teaching Protocol and Certification

Effective May 1, 2018

In 2018, the Operational Risk Committee’s recommendations for Backstroke Start Teaching Protocol and Certification were adopted. The recommendations took care to keep this process as streamlined as possible for coaches. This new certification is now combined with the Forward Start Certification adopted in 2009. The new requirement (Backstroke Start certification) is to be effective on May 1, 2018.

Progression

How to Talk to Young Athletes When Their Role Model Falls from Grace

By Dr. Roberta Kraus, Ph.D., TrueSport, April 2018

Elite athletes are a source of inspiration and adulation for many young athletes, and elite athletes generally have some great traits and habits for young people to emulate. They set ambitious goals, commit to their training, work hard, overcome adversity, and much more. But, athletes are human and have flaws like everyone else.

For youth and adolescent athletes, it can be heartbreaking when a sports hero falls from grace, but there are strategies parents can use to help young athletes process the news and teach them valuable lessons about role models.

Learn More

What to do When Your Favorite Coach Leaves

By Dr. Alan Goldberg, Competitivedge.com, April 9, 2018 

You have loved going to practice!

The sets have been challenging and important.

You can feel yourself getting stronger and faster with each passing week.

Competition has been a lot of fun and you've learned to love the challenge of big meets!

Your world has been a wonderful place because you REALLY like your coach. He/she is kind, respectful, clearly cares about you, KNOWS WHAT THEY ARE DOING and motivates you to work really hard and get as good as you can...

What to do

Can Youth Sports be Both Fun and Competitive?

By Reed Maltbie, Changingthegameproject.com, April 3, 2018

I got an email from a distraught parent the other day. She described a scene where the coach was screaming at the girls after a loss. She was beside herself at how the coach treated the girls. He was demeaning, he was loud and scary, and he had lost perspective on the age he was coaching.

She said at one point the coach barked “You’re not here to have fun! You are here to work!” The coach felt the girls were not trying hard enough, were not fully engaged, and did not want to win as badly as he did. The worse they played, the more frustrated he got.

The girls were 8-years old!

Learn More Here

USADA News

The information below should be shared with your athletes and their parents. Please distribute it via email, a club newsletter, or link to the articles on your team webpage.


Supplements:

The decision of whether to take #supplements should not be taken lightly. Visit our website to read case studies that provide a glimpse of what can happen when the risks aren't fully understood. https://www.usada.org/substances/supplement-411/realize-safety-issues-exist/case-studies-arbitration-decisions/

Green tea is an example of a dietary #supplement that can be sold in a variety of ways, including as a food or a drug. REALIZE that safety issues exist.

Resources:

Donating plasma (or plasmapheresis) is prohibited under the 2018 WADA Prohibited List.

Substance Profile: Meldonium - what is it and how does it work?

Stand up for your right to a level playing field. Report the abuse of performance-enhancing drugs.

In Praise of the Late Developer

By Ed Smith, newstatesman.com, March 28, 2018

The success of late developers proves that our obsession with early achievement is wrong.

A fortnight ago, I fell into a conversation with the head teacher of a local school. “You’ve got to create room for late developers,” he said. “The obsession with early attainment doesn’t suit most children.”

We were soon finishing each other’s sentences – talking about long-term confidence rather than short term hothousing, how children don’t develop in a linear way, and the value of having transferable skills rather than a single focus from a young age.

Learn More

Fear, Greed, Broken Dreams: How Early Sports Specialization is Eroding Youth Sports

By J.J. Adams, Vancouversun.com, April 1, 2018

Kyle Turris is an NHLer because of his dog.

Well, maybe not exactly, but while growing up his golden retriever deserves at least some of the credit for turning Turris into a 12-year NHL veteran. His ball-obsessed dog would chase a young Turris around their Burnaby backyard, the future hockey pro carrying a ball in his lacrosse stick as his hyperactive blur of fur tried to snag the hard rubber prize.

Call it skills training.

Read more here

Respecting Boundaries In The Parent-Coach Relationship

By Summer Sanders, Positive Coaching Alliance, April 4, 2018

In this clip, Sanders explains the importance of parents playing an appropriate role in their communication with children's coaches. When parents feel the need to intervene in the coach-athletes relationship, they should only address developmental issues, such as whether the athlete is having fun and what might help their children enjoy the sport more (short of addressing technical coaching issues and strategies). Within those bounds, Sanders is all for parents feeling empowered to talk with coaches about what will help their kids benefit most from sports.

Watch Summer

To Raise Resilient Kids, Be a Resilient Parent

By Emily F. Popek, NYTimes.com, March 28, 2018 

As parents, we want our children to be emotionally resilient — able to handle life’s ups and downs. But parents’ ability to foster resilience in our children hinges a great deal on our own emotional resilience.

emotions,” said Dr. Dan Siegel, author of “The Yes Brain,” which focuses on cultivating children’s resilience.

Yet for many parents, taking the temper tantrums and meltdowns in stride presents a challenge — especially if we have unrealistic expectations of what childhood is really all about.

“Part of it is this idea that we have that parenthood should be this amazing, blissful, perfect culmination of our hopes and dreams,” said Katherine Reynolds Lewis, author of the forthcoming book “The Good News About Bad Behavior.”

Resilience

How Norway Won the Winter Olympics

By Tom Farrey, The Aspen Institute, February 27, 2018

Apart from that little North Korea diplomacy thing, the transcendent story of the PyeongChang Games was Norway, which performed better than any nation in the history of the Winter Olympics. Its athletes earned a record 39 medals, a stunning 16 more than the United States, reaching the podium not just in its traditional strengths of cross-country skiing and biathlon but also in alpine skiing, speed skating, ski jumping, and freestyle skiing. Norway is a nation of just 5.3 million people, a population not much larger than Greater Detroit. 

Read More
 

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