Coach Connection Newsletter #12  -  3/24/2017

Coach Connection Newsletter #12 - 3/24/2017

 | Friday, March 24, 2017

1. USADA Update
2. Tips for Consistent Nutrition
3. Find all New 2017 TrueSport Lessons on Deck Pass
4. Help your Team Win $1,000 Grant by Entering the Built with Chocolate Milk Coaches Challenge
5. Breaststroke - Radical Cobra
6. Turns - Plant Hand Push
7. Trust, Talent and Time
8. Louder than Words
9. 100 Ways to Create Outstanding Leaders
10. Geno Auriemma on Great Athletes

Quote of the week:
“If you are afraid of failure, you don’t deserve to be successful!”
~Charles Barkley

USADA Update

Educate yourself and your athletes/their parents about the dietary supplement industry! Visit USADA’s Supplement 411 website.

Supplement Red Flags - Learn to recognize them. Learn to Reduce your risk. #supplements #cleansport

Tips for Consistent Nutrition

By Chris Rosenbloom, PhD, RDN, CSSD

In the Winter 2017 issue of Splash, I was intrigued by Olivier Poirier-Leroy’s article titled, “Staying Consistent.” It made me think of ways that swimmers should heed Poirier-Leroy’s advice and apply it to eating behaviors. So, with a thank you to Olivier, let’s review how the advice applies to fueling and hydration.

Consistent Process: When it comes to food, consistent process means eating to fuel training and competition every day.

Learn more here:

Find All New 2017 TrueSport Lessons on Deck Pass

by Joseph Bloggers

Starting this week, you can collect new TrueSport lesson patches on Deck Pass! Follow Olympic gold medalist Cody Miller as he gives you tips to become a TrueSport champion starting with a lesson on nutrition.

Click here Find all New 2017 TrueSport Lessons on Deck Pass
Starting today you can collect new TrueSport lesson patches on Deck Pass! Follow Olympic gold medalist Cody Miller as he gives you tips to become a TrueSport champion starting with a lesson on nutrition.

Click here to collect your first patch of 2017!

Help your Team Win $1,000 Grant by Entering the Built with Chocolate Milk Coaches Challenge

Do you encourage low-fat chocolate milk post-workout? If so, share your story for a chance to win one of five $1,000 grants for your swim team!

Now through and May 12, enter the 2017 BUILT WITH CHOCOLATE MILK Coaches Challenge by sharing a photo or video* via email (BuiltWithChocolateMilk@MilkPEP.org) or on Twitter or Instagram showing how you are building your teams’ success with chocolate milk, tagging BUILT WITH CHOCOLATE MILK (@chocolate milk on Twitter or
@BUILTWITHCHOCOLATEMILK on Instagram) and using #CoachChallenge and #promo.

Complete contest rules and more on the post-workout benefits of low-fat chocolate milk can be found here.

Breaststroke - Radical Cobra

By Glenn Mills, GoSwim Video of the Week, March 15, 2017

Every swim coach and teacher knows that sometimes getting the athlete to do what you want them to do, takes radical attempts.

Why do it:
Radical moves mean you're going to over teach something with the hope the goal will be illustrated within that action. In this case, drawing the hips forward to set up the kick.

How to do it:
1 - Have the swimmer lay flat on the surface and initiate a breaststroke pull to draw the hips forward.
2 - In this radical first step, to assure the hips coming forward, have the swimmer aim the recovering hands to the sky, or very high.
3 - This really doesn't have as much to do with the direction of the hands, but rather the over teaching action that will cause the target action to happen, drawing the hips forward.
4 - Gradually lower the where the hands aim and slowly introduce the kick.
How to do it really well (the fine points)
Don't be shy about asking the swimmer to do something radical. If you've ever tried to get a swimmer to stop over reaching on backstroke, you understand this concept.
These more radical actions need to isolate a specific action, and that action needs to be focused on through the gradual process back to a normal stroke... again, in this case, only focusing on drawing the hips forward to set up the kick.

See more lessons about breaststroke kick:
Get your free account set up and get a new video everyday:

Turns - Plant Hand Push

By Glenn Mills, GoSwim Video of the Week, March 22, 2017

Using the wall for leverage can help some swimmers develop a faster open turn.

Why do it:
Using the plant hand to help you spin into a fast turn can get you ready for a great push more quickly.

How to do it:
1 - Have the swimmer kick in to the wall with the plant hand extended.
2 - When they make contact with the wall, allow the arm to collapse and have the head move close to the hand.
3 - Push back on the hand causing the body to push backward. This is also a good body stabilization exercise.
4 - After the swimmer feels the press of the hand, have the swimmer use the plant hand to help SPIN the body into the turn.

How to do it really well (the fine points):
Obviously, you'll move this forward to a two hand touch, but with the same focus. Start to increase the speed of the spin, and eventually move to a breaststroke or butterfly full stroke turn.

See more lessons about open turns:

Get your free account set up and get a new video everyday:

Trust, Talent and Time

By Mike Neighbors, Head Coach University of Washington Women’s basketball

University of Washington Head Women’s Coach Mike Neighbors was a long-time and very productive D1 assistant coach after being a successful high school coach.

He has seen from many vantage points what it takes for an assistant to contribute to a program. Scroll below to read some of his thoughts:

He has an outstanding newsletter–probably the longest running in the profession of coaching basketball. Send me an email if you would like to be added to his newsletter email list.

This is the first part of the article. I have a link to part 2 of this piece at the bottom of the article.

TRUST, TALENT, TIME

To be a good assistant coach, I believe your Head Coach needs three things from you:

TRUST, TALENT, TIME

Learn more here:

Louder than Words

Why visual demonstrations, body language matters to athletes
By Brenae Williams, Coachad.com, March 2017

It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it. This concept is relevant in coaching, especially as it relates to young athletes.

Players respond differently to instruction, cues and feedback. Some respond well to demonstration, while others respond to verbal instructions. Ultimately, it’s the responsibility of the coach to make sure a team is cohesive and responds positively in most situations.

Coaches and athletes must be on the same page to maximize potential.

Learn more here:

100 Ways to Create Outstanding Leaders

By Billy Arcement, Contributing Writer, The Business Journals.com, March 16, 2017

Don’t be hasty reading through these ideas. Discuss them with your team. Digest the meaning and how to implement them. Make this a long term commitment for high-end results. Go for it!

1) Focus equally on what not to do and what to stop doing. Develop a “stop doing” list.

Learn more here:

Geno Auriemma on Great Athletes

Interview for NCAA Tournament

Watch here:

If you are a coach and are not receiving this weekly newsletter, send an email to Dave Thomas requesting that you be adding to the list. Please indicate which Zone (Eastern, Southern, Central or Western) your club is located in.


 

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